J-Term 2013 Registration Information

Students are not required to take a course during the J-Term in order to maintain full-time status in their program. However, certain programs have core courses offered only during the J-term.

Before proceeding with registration for J-Term, read this page carefully. You will be responsible for the information printed here. The J-Term 2013 course schedule is now available. Online registration for the J-Term will open on Monday, November 12 at 7:00 a.m. Registration will close on Friday, November 28 at 11:59 p.m. If you fail to register a course by the November 28 deadline, you will incur a $50 late registration fee.

You will not be able to register if you have a balance on your account. You will either need to pay the bill in full, or make payment arrangements with the Financial Services office. The Registrar’s Office cannot open registration for you if you have a balance.

To register, go to Portals/Students/Register.

Once you are initially registered, you may change, add, or drop courses online without penalty until Wednesday, January 9 at 4:30 p.m.

All independent studies, major papers and theses must be registered by Friday, December 14, 2012 at 4:30 p.m. to avoid a $50 late fee.

If you need technical assistance in accessing the schedule, contact Seminary IT. If you have questions regarding course eligibility or other non-technical matters, please contact The Registrar’s Office.

For course descriptions, refer to this page on the web site: Course Descriptions

For a list of electives that are offered in 2012/2013, listed by category, see this page: 2012-2013 Electives

  • Full-time MDiv students in their first year of studies need to take the course Learning to Use Bible Software (717B) for 1 credit. In addition, first year full-time MDiv students need to take the course Introduction to Missional Ministry (311B) for 2 credits.
  • First year MTS students need to take the course Learning to Use Bible Software (717B) for 1 credit.  Full-time MTS students in their second year will likely want to take an elective.
  • If you are scheduled to take the Introduction to Bible Software course, you will need a lap top and the Logos software. If you have questions, please contact Professor Bosma.
  • Practicum in Teaching with Technology (478B) is a 4 day course that is part of the elective Practicum in Teaching.  However, you may take just the technology piece, which meets January 14-17 and January 22.  As with all Skill Development courses, you are encouraged to audit.  MDiv students may take two Skill Development courses for credit to equal an elective in their program.
  • Greek Review (491B) and Hebrew Review (490B) are offered during the J-Term.  Some students may be required to take these courses, either for audit or credit.  Others may choose to audit one or both courses.  These courses cannot be used for credit in your program.
  • All other MDiv and all MTS students may choose to take an elective during the J-Term.
Mentoring groups do not meet during the J-Term.

Registration of Papers, Independent Studies, and Theses

MDiv and MTS students who want to register an independent study or a major paper need to pick up the appropriate form from Denise Mokma, Administrative Assistant for Academic Affairs.  The forms must be returned to Deniseby 4:30 p.m. on Friday, December 14 in order to avoid a $50 late fee. Though the forms are not due until December, you should make arrangements with a supervising professor well before that time.

MDiv students in the Distance Learning program may take the Introduction to Bible Software course (Logos-717D) in the J-Term. The course is purely online, with no intensive requirement.

MA students in their last year of studies should register for the MA Integrative Project course (732). This course will also include preparation for your Oral Comprehensive exam, which will take place in the Spring.

All other MA students may register for an elective.   Here are some options for you:

  • MA Worship Students- the following courses can serve as an elective in your program:
    • History of Christian Worship
    • Revitalizing Churches
    • Ministry to and with Prisoners
    •  The course Practicum in Teaching with Technology can serve as a 1 credit Skill course in your program.
  • MA Educational Ministry students-the following courses can serve as an elective in your program:
    • Ministry to and with Prisoners
    • Practicum in Teaching
    • Biblical Concepts and Greek Thought
    • Human Sexuality, Culture and Ministry
  • MA Evangelism and Missions students- the following courses can serve as an elective in your program:
    • Revitalizing Churches
    • Human Sexuality, Culture and Ministry
    • Ministry to and with Prisoners
    • Travel Course:  Seeds of Justice, Harvest of Shalom
    • Biblical Concepts and Greek Thought
  • MA Youth and Family Ministries students – the following courses can serve as an elective program:
    • Practicum in Teaching
    • Human Sexuality, Culture, and Ministry
    • Ministry to and with Prisoners
    • Biblical Concepts in Greek Thought
  • MA Pastoral Care students- the following courses can serve as an elective in your program:
    • Ministry to and With Prisoners
    • Human Sexuality, Culture and Ministry
  • MA Bible and Theology students- the following electives can serve as an elective in your program:
    • Biblical Concepts and Greek Thought
    • History of Christian Worship
    • Human Sexuality, Culture, and Ministry
    • Travel Course: Seeds of Justice, Harvest of Shalom
  • Mentoring Groups do not meet during the J-Term

Registration of Papers, Independent Studies, and Theses

MA students who want to register an independent study or a major paper need to pick up the appropriate form from Denise Mokma, Administrative Assistant for Academic Affairs.  The forms must be returned to Deniseby 4:30 p.m. on Friday, December 14 in order to avoid a $50 late fee. Though the forms are not due until December, you should make arrangements with a supervising professor well before that time.

ThM students may choose to take an elective during the J-Term, but they are not required to do so.

ThM students who need to register an Independent Study, a major paper, or a thesis need to download the appropriate form from the Registrar’s Office page on the web site.

You will need to bring the necessary paper work, complete with the signature of your study/paper supervisor, to Dr. Avila’s office no later than Friday, December 14, at 4:30 p.m.

*Exegesis of the Book of Exodus (502B) taught by Dr. Leder.

This course exercises exegetical and theological understanding of the book of Exodus in its larger canonical context, and its abiding address to the Church. Basic exegetical skills and knowledge of the Hebrew language and computer assisted exegetical skills are assumed.

*Practicum in Teaching (659B) taught by Dr. Glassford

Enhances teaching effectiveness by practicing, reflecting, and critiquing student presentations; explores various teaching styles, and introduces presentation design, software packages, and online resources for enhancing instruction.

*History of Christian Worship (874B) taught by Dr. Witvliet

This course encourages students to examine the elements of worship (e.g., preaching, sacraments, music, prayer, confession, leadership) in different periods of history as well as look in depth at the worship of a few communities in specific times and places.  We will reflect on the implications of this history for worship practice in our diverse settings today:  how can our worship, for example, respect our organic connection to the body of Christ in all times and places?  Or, how does studying the history of worship help us discern what should be stable and what should be flexible in Christian worship?

Note:  this course will also be taught in the J-Term by Dr. Rylaarsdam in Mexico.  If you are interested in the possibility of taking this course in Mexico, please talk with Dr. Rylaarsdam.

*Ministry to and with Prisoners (651B) taught by Professor Rottman

This course will expose students to some of the important elements of prison ministry through reading, discussions, and an on-site prison visit.  Students will spend 5 days at Angola State Penitentiary in Louisiana, a maximum security prison once known as the bloodiest prison in the South.  We will spend time in the prison’s seminary; visit with prisoners on death row, and worship with some of the 32 congregations within the prison walls.  Students who do not wish to take this course as an elective may wish to go on the trip.  Students taking the course for credit will be given priority.

*Revitalizing Churches (674B) taught by Dr. Harry Reeder, Pastor at Briarwood Presbysterian Church in Birmingham, AL.

The course will also be attended by area pastors and other church leaders.  The course is an intensive 3 day series that will meet January 22-24 at Evergreen Ministries in Hudsonville, Michigan.  This course presents a Biblical paradigm of church revitalization, its importance and impact on authentic worship. Dr. Reeder, the main lecturer, will lay out what the Bible teaches about church revitalization and how it positions the church for revival, renewal and growth that is first spiritual, then functional, and then statistical.  Functional growth impacts worship. The objective is a W.E.L.L. church: Worship with authenticity, Evangelism with intentionality, Love with purpose, and Learning by disciple-making.

*Human Sexuality, Culture, and Ministry (670B) taught by Rev. Dr. Peter Kang, Professor of Mission and Family Studies at Grace Mission University in Fullerton, CA; Family Pastor at All Nations Church (CRC) in Lakeview Terrace, CA; and Ministry Partner Professor of Pastoral Care and Missiology at Calvin Theological Seminary.

Human sexuality is an aspect of social interaction that is especially volatile in the practice of cross-cultural ministry. The sexual drive and emotional needs of persons engaged in ministry relationships and the differing cultural expectations about the regulation and control of courtship, marriage, gender roles and sexual behavior create a potentially explosive blend of interpersonal and social expectations. This course will examine the ways in which people across cultures seek to regulate sexual behavior, and provide biblical and comparative cultural perspectives on the topic. Assignments will guide students toward understanding themselves and understanding others on this topic.  The course will help students begin the process of reflection on sexuality, the grace of God, and constructive social and spiritual disciplines that may lead to effective cross-cultural ministry.

*Biblical Concepts and Greek Thought (536B) taught Dr. Kyung Jik (Chris) Lee, Chair and Associate Professor of Christian Ethics and Philosophy, Baekseok University, Korea

How can our preaching and teaching of Scripture be shaped by the Bible’s worldview, and what relationship does that worldview have with non-Christian worldviews? In response to this question, this course is designed to understand key biblical concepts in relation to Greek thought. For example, how does the biblical concept of God the creator compare with Plato’s concept of the demiurge? How does the biblical concept of the soul compare with that of Homer, Plato, and Aristotle? How do biblical concepts of love and justice compare with the views of Plato and Aristotle on love and justice? How does the biblical concept of kingdom compare with the concept of kingdom in Homer and Plato? How does the biblical concept of law compare with the Stoic concept of law? Questions such as these will be pursued by reading Scripture and primary sources in Greek thought.

 Please click on the links below to view a PDF document describing the course:

*Seeds of Justice, Harvest of Shalom (529B or 529BT) includes a travel component to Honduras.   Before registering for the course, please talk with Dr. Avila to confirm.

*Gospel Preaching (605B) taught by Kevin Adams, Pastor of Granite Springs Church in Lincoln, CA; Ministry Partner Professor of Church Planting at Calvin SeminaryThis course involves travel to Sacramento, CA.